Wes Montgomery – Jazz Guitar Music Legend Part 1-ghost observer

Wes Montgomery – Jazz Guitar Music Legend Part 1-ghost observer

July 23, 2018
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Arts-and-Entertainment Wes Montgomery was the guiding force behind the second great epic of modern jazz guitar music! If we consider the first as having started with the early experiments of jazz guitarist Charlie Christian in the late 1930s and early 1940s, then the next revolution belongs to Wes Montgomery. Like the musical cataclysm caused by Christian’s solo flights, Montgomery had an equally powerful impact on his contemporaries. Virtually all established guitarists went scurrying back to the woodshed to incorporate his patented octave playing and block chording into their music and to emulate his warm fleshy tone, blues based conception, and strongly swinging rhythmic feel. Jazz guitar music itself has come to be defined by his presence as either pre-Montgomery or post-Montgomery in concept and level of performance. Practically every jazz guitar player to emerge after Wes Montgomery has borne the mark of his influence – Joe Pass, George Benson, Pat Martino, Pat Metheny, Emily Remler, Larry Coryell, Larry Carlton and Lee Ritenour to name but a few. Wes Montgomery was born John Leslie Montgomery in Indiannapolis, Indiana on March 6, 1923. He never received formal music training but throughout his youth he was interested in music and was encouraged by his older brother Monk – who later became famous for pioneering the development of the Fender electric bass guitar. In 1935 Monk bought him his first instrument, a thirteen dollar 4-string tenor guitar on which Wes developed some basic technique. Wes officially picked up the 6-string guitar relatively late in life, at the age of 19. Initially inspired by the work of Charlie Christian, he taught himself by diligently copying Christian’s solos from recordings note-for-note. By the time he reached his twentieth birthday, Wes was gigging regularly at local jazz clubs playing Charlie Christian solos. Wes Montgomery’s first professional break came when he secured a job with Lionel Hampton’s band in 1948. Relentless touring and grueling road work made up his life for the next two years and through the experience he was exposed to musicians like Charlie Mingus, Fats Navarro and Milt Bruckner and became a seasoned jazz player. A devoted family man, Wes quit extensive touring in 1950 and stayed in Indianapolis afterward, playing sporadic club gigs mixed with non-musical day jobs. Montgomery’s first recording session was with "The Master Sounds" – featuring his brothers Buddy and Monk on vibraphone and bass respectively – on December 30th 1957 for the Pacific Jazz record label. The tracks were released as the album "The Montgomery Brothers and Five Others". Two other records were made by "The Master Sounds" – "Kissmet" in 1958 and "The Montgomery Land Quintet" in 1959. None of these releases brought Wes Montgomery the widespread recognition that his extraordinary jazz guitar talent deserved. About the Author: 相关的主题文章:

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